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Seasonal Flu & Shingles Vaccinations

Seasonal Flu Vaccinations

Seasonal flu is a highly infectious illness caused by a flu virus.

The virus infects your lungs and upper airways, causing a sudden high temperature and general aches and pains.

You could also lose your appetite, feel nauseous and have a dry cough. Symptoms can last for up to a week.

We offer 'at risk' groups the flu vaccine at a certain time each year to protect you against the flu virus.

You may be invited for a flu jab if you are:

  • Over 65 years of age
  • Pregnant
  • Or have:
    • a serious heart or chest complaint, including asthma
    • serious kidney disease
    • diabetes
    • lowered immunity due to disease or treatment such as steroid medication or cancer treatment
    • if you have ever had a stroke

ALL healthy children who are aged 2, 3 and 4 years old are invited to receive a new flu vaccine this year. This is in the form of a nasal spray. For more information, read the leaflet.

Our Flu Clinics can now be booked - please call the surgery on 01628 620 458.

Clinics will be held by the nurses at various times.

If you have any queries or would like to book an appointment please contact the surgery.

For more information please visit the websites below:

Flu and the Flu Vaccine - NHS Choices

Protect your child against flu


Shingles Vaccinations

All patients who were aged 70, 71 78 or 79 on 1st September 2015 are entitled to receive the shingles vaccine free on the NHS. The national shingles immunisation programme was introduced by the Department of Health to help protect those most at risk from shingles and its complications.

Click here to see if you are eligible: Shingles Vaccine

What is shingles? Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a painful skin rash caused by the reactivation of the chickenpox virus (varicella-zoster virus) in people who have previously had chickenpox.

It begins with a burning sensation in the skin, followed by a rash of very painful fluid-filled blisters that can then burst and turn into sores before healing. Often an area on just one side of the body is affected, usually the chest but sometimes the head, face and eye. Read more about the shingles.

Get answers to some of the most common questions people ask about the shingles vaccine.

MENACWY Vaccination letter



 
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