You may notice a test result appear in your NHS app referring to segmentation. Segmentation is a simple way of categorising patients based on their specific health needs. It helps us as a practice understand the individual needs of our patients based on their health and wellbeing to support  personalised care and ensures you get the right support in a timely way.

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Patient News

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Walk & Talk Sessions
15 May, 2024
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Breathe Easy Asthma webinars
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Veterans
15 May, 2024
3 May, 2024
COVID VACCINATIONS

Covid-19 booster campaign spring 2024 - The Spring Booster Campaign commenced on 22 April and will run to 30 June 2024.

Eligible cohorts are:

• adults aged 75 years and over

• residents in a care home for older adults

• individuals aged 6 months and over who are immunosuppressed

Maidenhead Primary Care Network continue to provide the vaccination service for local practices and all patients in cohort have now been invited to book. If you believe you are in cohort , but have not received a booking invite then please call the surgery for assistance.

LOCATION: The vaccine delivery has now moved from The Desborough Suite to St. Mark's Hospital Out Patient Department SL6 6DU.

CLINICS WILL NOW BE REDCUED - NEXT CLINCIS ON SATURDAY 25TH MAY & 1ST JUNE 2024, 08:30-12:30.

Covid-19 booster campaign spring 2024 - The Spring Booster Campaign commenced on 22 April and will run to 30 June 2024.

Eligible cohorts are:

• adults aged 75 years and over

• residents in a care home for older adults

• individuals aged 6 months and over who are immunosuppressed

Maidenhead Primary Care Network continue to provide the vaccination service for local practices and all patients in cohort have now been invited to book. If you believe you are in cohort , but have not received a booking invite then please call the surgery for assistance.

LOCATION: The vaccine delivery has now moved from The Desborough Suite to St. Mark's Hospital Out Patient Department SL6 6DU.

CLINICS WILL NOW BE REDCUED - NEXT CLINCIS ON SATURDAY 25TH MAY & 1ST JUNE 2024, 08:30-12:30.

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Choose the right service

Making the right choice means getting the treatment you need without unnecessary disruption & delay & without adding to your worries. https://orlo.uk/maketherightchoice_UMcbU #MakeTheRightChoice

Making the right choice means getting the treatment you need without unnecessary disruption & delay & without adding to your worries. https://orlo.uk/maketherightchoice_UMcbU #MakeTheRightChoice

27 Mar, 2024
4 Mar, 2024
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Quit Smoking
MMR

MMR Vaccination

Measles cases are likely to spread rapidly unless more people are vaccinated, the UK Health Security Agency says.

More than four million parents and carers, as well as many young adults, are being contacted because they, or their children, have missed out on one, or both, doses of the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine.

How can I get the MMR vaccine?

The first MMR dose is usually administered at 12 months old, while the second jab is administered around three years and four months old.

Adults and children can be vaccinated at any point by their GP if they have missed their initial doses.

If you or your child has not been vaccinated, contact the surgery to book an appointment for an MMR vaccination. 

What is measles and what are the symptoms?

Measles is a highly contagious disease which is spread by coughs and sneezes.

Common symptoms include:

  • high fever
  • sore, red and watery eyes
  • coughing
  • sneezing

Small white spots may appear inside the mouth.

A blotchy red or brown rash usually appears after a few days, typically on the face and behind the ears, before spreading to the rest of the body.

It can be harder to see on brown and black skin.

Measles normally clears up within seven to 10 days. However, complications can include pneumonia, meningitis, blindness and seizures.

Babies and young children, pregnant women and those with a weakened immune system are at increased risk.

Measles can be fatal, but this is rare.

Can adults get measles?

You can catch measles at any age.

If you catch it while pregnant, the disease can lead to stillbirth, miscarriage or babies being born small.

The NHS urges adults to ensure they have had both doses of the MMR vaccine before starting a family.

What should you do if you get measles?

The NHS advises patients to:

  • take paracetamol or ibuprofen to relieve fever, aches and pains - aspirin should not be given to children under 16 years old
  • rest and drink plenty of fluids
  • wash their hands regularly with soap, and clean their eyes with damp cotton wool
  • put used tissues and cotton wool in the bin

You should go to A&E or phone 999 if you or your child:

  • have shortness of breath
  • have a high temperature that does not come down with paracetamol or ibuprofen
  • are coughing up blood
  • feel drowsy or confused
  • have fits (convulsions)

Pregnant women or those with a weakened immune system should seek urgent medical advice after contact with someone with measles.

MMR Vaccination

Measles cases are likely to spread rapidly unless more people are vaccinated, the UK Health Security Agency says.

More than four million parents and carers, as well as many young adults, are being contacted because they, or their children, have missed out on one, or both, doses of the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine.

How can I get the MMR vaccine?

The first MMR dose is usually administered at 12 months old, while the second jab is administered around three years and four months old.

Adults and children can be vaccinated at any point by their GP if they have missed their initial doses.

If you or your child has not been vaccinated, contact the surgery to book an appointment for an MMR vaccination. 

What is measles and what are the symptoms?

Measles is a highly contagious disease which is spread by coughs and sneezes.

Common symptoms include:

  • high fever
  • sore, red and watery eyes
  • coughing
  • sneezing

Small white spots may appear inside the mouth.

A blotchy red or brown rash usually appears after a few days, typically on the face and behind the ears, before spreading to the rest of the body.

It can be harder to see on brown and black skin.

Measles normally clears up within seven to 10 days. However, complications can include pneumonia, meningitis, blindness and seizures.

Babies and young children, pregnant women and those with a weakened immune system are at increased risk.

Measles can be fatal, but this is rare.

Can adults get measles?

You can catch measles at any age.

If you catch it while pregnant, the disease can lead to stillbirth, miscarriage or babies being born small.

The NHS urges adults to ensure they have had both doses of the MMR vaccine before starting a family.

What should you do if you get measles?

The NHS advises patients to:

  • take paracetamol or ibuprofen to relieve fever, aches and pains - aspirin should not be given to children under 16 years old
  • rest and drink plenty of fluids
  • wash their hands regularly with soap, and clean their eyes with damp cotton wool
  • put used tissues and cotton wool in the bin

You should go to A&E or phone 999 if you or your child:

  • have shortness of breath
  • have a high temperature that does not come down with paracetamol or ibuprofen
  • are coughing up blood
  • feel drowsy or confused
  • have fits (convulsions)

Pregnant women or those with a weakened immune system should seek urgent medical advice after contact with someone with measles.

5 Feb, 2024
15 Jan, 2024
Private Referrals

The Cedars Surgery is happy to raise a referral as private instead of NHS, however please be aware that any subsequent investigations requested through the private sector should be conducted through them and do not automatically fall within the scope of the NHS.

Prescriptions should also be provided for by your private team. Once you are stable on treatment and if  appropriate we will consider taking over prescribing. C ertain drugs fall within  a 'shared care arrangement', prescribing these drugs on the NHS is voluntary and based on clinical and capacity grounds. 

If an onward referral to NHS services is deemed appropriate and you fulfil the eligibility criteria then the private provider can do this without a  requesting a referral by you GP.

The Cedars Surgery is happy to raise a referral as private instead of NHS, however please be aware that any subsequent investigations requested through the private sector should be conducted through them and do not automatically fall within the scope of the NHS.

Prescriptions should also be provided for by your private team. Once you are stable on treatment and if  appropriate we will consider taking over prescribing. C ertain drugs fall within  a 'shared care arrangement', prescribing these drugs on the NHS is voluntary and based on clinical and capacity grounds. 

If an onward referral to NHS services is deemed appropriate and you fulfil the eligibility criteria then the private provider can do this without a  requesting a referral by you GP.

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NHS App: A More Secure and Reliable Way to Receive Messages from Your Surgery

Please click the link below to download the NHS App.

NHS App | www.nhs.uk

Please click the link below to download the NHS App.

NHS App | www.nhs.uk

18 Aug, 2023
17 Aug, 2023
Fear of Flying - Practice Policy

Use of Benzodiazepines (and related medications) for flying

Diazepam in the UK is a Class C/Schedule IV controlled drug. The following short guide outlines the issues surrounding its use with regards to flying and why the surgery no longer prescribes such medications for this purpose.

People often come to us requesting the doctor or nurse to prescribe diazepam for fear of flying or assist with sleep during flights. Diazepam is a sedative, which means it makes you sleepy and more relaxed. There are a number of very good reasons why prescribing this drug is not recommended.

According to the prescribing guidelines doctors follow (British National Formulary) diazepam is contraindicated (not allowed) for treating phobias (fears). It also states that “the use of benzodiazepines to treat short-term ‘mild’ anxiety is inappropriate.” Your doctor would be taking a significant legal risk by prescribing against these guidelines. They are only licensed short term for a crisis in generalised anxiety. If this is the case, you should be getting proper care and support for your mental health and not going on a flight. Fear of flying in isolation is not a generalised anxiety disorder.

Although plane emergencies are a rare occurrence there are concerns about reduced awareness and reaction times for patients taking Diazepam which could pose a significant risk to themselves and others due to not being able to react in a manner which could save their life in the event of an emergency on board necessitating evacuation.

 The use of such sedative drugs can make you fall asleep, however when you do sleep it is an unnatural non-REM sleep. This means you won’t move around as much as during natural sleep. This can cause you to be at an increased risk of developing a blood clot (Deep Vein Thrombosis - DVT) in the leg or even the lungs. Blood clots are very dangerous and can even prove fatal. This risk is even greater if your flight is greater than 4 hours, the amount of time which has been shown to increase the risk of developing DVT whether in an aeroplane or elsewhere.

Whilst most people find Diazepam sedating, a small number have paradoxical agitation and aggression. They can also cause disinhibition and lead you to behave in a way that you would not normally which can pose a risk on the plane. This could impact on your safety as well as that of other passengers and could also get you into trouble with the law. A similar effect can be seen with alcohol, which has led to people being removed from flights.

Diazepam and similar controlled drugs are illegal in a number of countries. They may be confiscated or you may find yourself in trouble with the police. The passenger may also need to use a different strategy for the homeward bound journey and/or other legs of the journey

It is important to declare all medical conditions and medications you take to your travel insurer. If not, there is a risk of nullifying any insurance policy you may have.

Given the above, The Cedars Surgery will no longer be providing Diazepam or similar drugs for flight anxiety and instead suggest the below aviation industry recommended flight anxiety courses.

Flight anxiety does not come under the remit of General Medical Services as defined in the GP contract and so we are not obliged to prescribe for this.  Patients who still wish to take benzodiazepines for flight anxiety are advised to consult with a private GP.

For further information:

https://thefearofflying.com/programs/fly-and-be-calm/

https://www.fearlessflyer.easyjet.com/

https://www.britishairways.com/en-gb/information/travel-assistance/flying-with-confidence

https://www.flyingwithoutfear.com/

Use of Benzodiazepines (and related medications) for flying

Diazepam in the UK is a Class C/Schedule IV controlled drug. The following short guide outlines the issues surrounding its use with regards to flying and why the surgery no longer prescribes such medications for this purpose.

People often come to us requesting the doctor or nurse to prescribe diazepam for fear of flying or assist with sleep during flights. Diazepam is a sedative, which means it makes you sleepy and more relaxed. There are a number of very good reasons why prescribing this drug is not recommended.

According to the prescribing guidelines doctors follow (British National Formulary) diazepam is contraindicated (not allowed) for treating phobias (fears). It also states that “the use of benzodiazepines to treat short-term ‘mild’ anxiety is inappropriate.” Your doctor would be taking a significant legal risk by prescribing against these guidelines. They are only licensed short term for a crisis in generalised anxiety. If this is the case, you should be getting proper care and support for your mental health and not going on a flight. Fear of flying in isolation is not a generalised anxiety disorder.

Although plane emergencies are a rare occurrence there are concerns about reduced awareness and reaction times for patients taking Diazepam which could pose a significant risk to themselves and others due to not being able to react in a manner which could save their life in the event of an emergency on board necessitating evacuation.

 The use of such sedative drugs can make you fall asleep, however when you do sleep it is an unnatural non-REM sleep. This means you won’t move around as much as during natural sleep. This can cause you to be at an increased risk of developing a blood clot (Deep Vein Thrombosis - DVT) in the leg or even the lungs. Blood clots are very dangerous and can even prove fatal. This risk is even greater if your flight is greater than 4 hours, the amount of time which has been shown to increase the risk of developing DVT whether in an aeroplane or elsewhere.

Whilst most people find Diazepam sedating, a small number have paradoxical agitation and aggression. They can also cause disinhibition and lead you to behave in a way that you would not normally which can pose a risk on the plane. This could impact on your safety as well as that of other passengers and could also get you into trouble with the law. A similar effect can be seen with alcohol, which has led to people being removed from flights.

Diazepam and similar controlled drugs are illegal in a number of countries. They may be confiscated or you may find yourself in trouble with the police. The passenger may also need to use a different strategy for the homeward bound journey and/or other legs of the journey

It is important to declare all medical conditions and medications you take to your travel insurer. If not, there is a risk of nullifying any insurance policy you may have.

Given the above, The Cedars Surgery will no longer be providing Diazepam or similar drugs for flight anxiety and instead suggest the below aviation industry recommended flight anxiety courses.

Flight anxiety does not come under the remit of General Medical Services as defined in the GP contract and so we are not obliged to prescribe for this.  Patients who still wish to take benzodiazepines for flight anxiety are advised to consult with a private GP.

For further information:

https://thefearofflying.com/programs/fly-and-be-calm/

https://www.fearlessflyer.easyjet.com/

https://www.britishairways.com/en-gb/information/travel-assistance/flying-with-confidence

https://www.flyingwithoutfear.com/

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Take action to protect Windsor & Maidenhead from measles this summer!
3 Aug, 2023
4 Aug, 2023
How you make a complaint about primary care services has changed

There are two ways people can make a complaint about GPs, dentists, opticians or pharmacies:

o They can complain to the healthcare provider: this is the organisation where they received the NHS service, for example a GP practice, a dental practice, a community pharmacy or an optometry practice or

o They can complain to the commissioner of the service: this is the organisation that paid for the service or care they received.

After 1 July 2023 if people want to make a complaint about primary care services to the commissioner, the way to do this is changing. Rather than contacting NHS England, people will contact the Complaints team via new contact details below:

South East Complaints Hub

NHS Frimley ICB

Aldershot Centre for Health

Hospital Hill 

Aldershot 

Hampshire 

GU11 1AY

Phone number: 0300 561 0290

Email address: frimleyicb.southeastcomplaints@nhs.net

As each email received is so important to the team, an acknowledgement to all complaints will be sent as soon as possible.

Information governance regulations mean that the emails sent to the old email address after 1 July, cannot be automatically forwarded and the inbox will not be accessible. People will therefore receive an automatic response, asking them to resend their email to the new address.

Members of the public with ongoing complaints received after 1 July 2022 will receive a letter from NHS England informing them that the Complaints team based in the South East Complaints Hub, hosted by NHS Frimley ICB will now be handling their complaint with confirmation of their case handler. We would like to reassure you that the current team and case handler will remain the same as the staff move organisation.

Members of the public will still be able to make a complaint to the provider. This is NOT changing. There is also no change for people wishing to make a complaint for specialised services, health and justice, screening and immunisations and Continuing Healthcare.

There are two ways people can make a complaint about GPs, dentists, opticians or pharmacies:

o They can complain to the healthcare provider: this is the organisation where they received the NHS service, for example a GP practice, a dental practice, a community pharmacy or an optometry practice or

o They can complain to the commissioner of the service: this is the organisation that paid for the service or care they received.

After 1 July 2023 if people want to make a complaint about primary care services to the commissioner, the way to do this is changing. Rather than contacting NHS England, people will contact the Complaints team via new contact details below:

South East Complaints Hub

NHS Frimley ICB

Aldershot Centre for Health

Hospital Hill 

Aldershot 

Hampshire 

GU11 1AY

Phone number: 0300 561 0290

Email address: frimleyicb.southeastcomplaints@nhs.net

As each email received is so important to the team, an acknowledgement to all complaints will be sent as soon as possible.

Information governance regulations mean that the emails sent to the old email address after 1 July, cannot be automatically forwarded and the inbox will not be accessible. People will therefore receive an automatic response, asking them to resend their email to the new address.

Members of the public with ongoing complaints received after 1 July 2022 will receive a letter from NHS England informing them that the Complaints team based in the South East Complaints Hub, hosted by NHS Frimley ICB will now be handling their complaint with confirmation of their case handler. We would like to reassure you that the current team and case handler will remain the same as the staff move organisation.

Members of the public will still be able to make a complaint to the provider. This is NOT changing. There is also no change for people wishing to make a complaint for specialised services, health and justice, screening and immunisations and Continuing Healthcare.

Heatwave: how to cope in hot weather.
9 Jun, 2023
Hay Fever

Hay fever is usually worse between late March and September, especially when it's warm, humid and windy. This is when the pollen count is at its highest.

Check if you have hay fever

Symptoms of hay fever include:

  • sneezing and coughing
  • a runny or blocked nose
  • itchy, red or watery eyes
  • itchy throat, mouth, nose and ears
  • loss of smell
  • pain around your temples and forehead
  • headache
  • earache
  • feeling tired

If you have asthma, you might also:

  • have a tight feeling in your chest
  • be short of breath
  • wheeze and cough

Hay fever will last for weeks or months, unlike a cold, which usually goes away after 1 to 2 weeks.

How to treat hay fever yourself

There's currently no cure for hay fever and you cannot prevent it.

But you can do things to ease your symptoms when the pollen count is high.

Do

  • put Vaseline around your nostrils to trap pollen
  • wear wraparound sunglasses to stop pollen getting into your eyes
  • shower and change your clothes after you have been outside to wash pollen off
  • stay indoors whenever possible
  • keep windows and doors shut as much as possible
  • vacuum regularly and dust with a damp cloth
  • buy a pollen filter for the air vents in your car and a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA filter
  • try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people if you have a high temperature or you do not feel well enough to do your normal activities

Don't

  • do not cut grass or walk on grass
  • do not spend too much time outside
  • do not keep fresh flowers in the house
  • do not smoke or be around smoke – it makes your symptoms worse
  • do not dry clothes outside – they can catch pollen
  • do not let pets into the house if possible – they can carry pollen indoors

Get more tips on managing hay fever from Allergy UK 

A pharmacist can help with hay fever

Speak to your pharmacist if you have hay fever.

They can give advice and suggest the best treatments, like antihistamine drops, tablets or nasal sprays to help with:

  • itchy and watery eyes and sneezing
  • a blocked nose

Call a pharmacy or contact them online before going in person. You can get medicines delivered or ask someone to collect them.

Find a pharmacy 

Hay fever is usually worse between late March and September, especially when it's warm, humid and windy. This is when the pollen count is at its highest.

Check if you have hay fever

Symptoms of hay fever include:

  • sneezing and coughing
  • a runny or blocked nose
  • itchy, red or watery eyes
  • itchy throat, mouth, nose and ears
  • loss of smell
  • pain around your temples and forehead
  • headache
  • earache
  • feeling tired

If you have asthma, you might also:

  • have a tight feeling in your chest
  • be short of breath
  • wheeze and cough

Hay fever will last for weeks or months, unlike a cold, which usually goes away after 1 to 2 weeks.

How to treat hay fever yourself

There's currently no cure for hay fever and you cannot prevent it.

But you can do things to ease your symptoms when the pollen count is high.

Do

  • put Vaseline around your nostrils to trap pollen
  • wear wraparound sunglasses to stop pollen getting into your eyes
  • shower and change your clothes after you have been outside to wash pollen off
  • stay indoors whenever possible
  • keep windows and doors shut as much as possible
  • vacuum regularly and dust with a damp cloth
  • buy a pollen filter for the air vents in your car and a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA filter
  • try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people if you have a high temperature or you do not feel well enough to do your normal activities

Don't

  • do not cut grass or walk on grass
  • do not spend too much time outside
  • do not keep fresh flowers in the house
  • do not smoke or be around smoke – it makes your symptoms worse
  • do not dry clothes outside – they can catch pollen
  • do not let pets into the house if possible – they can carry pollen indoors

Get more tips on managing hay fever from Allergy UK 

A pharmacist can help with hay fever

Speak to your pharmacist if you have hay fever.

They can give advice and suggest the best treatments, like antihistamine drops, tablets or nasal sprays to help with:

  • itchy and watery eyes and sneezing
  • a blocked nose

Call a pharmacy or contact them online before going in person. You can get medicines delivered or ask someone to collect them.

Find a pharmacy 

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Need help with your muscle or joint problems?

The getUBetter MSK app is provided free of charge by Frimley Health & Care ICS for registered patients at GP Practices. It can be accessed on a Smartphone or on the Web, and guides you day-by-day through a sequence of exercises, tips, and support to help you recover from a range of new, recurrent or long term conditions:

  • Lower back pain
  • Back and leg pain
  • Neck pain
  • Shoulder pain
  • Ankle pain
  • Knee pain
  • Soft Tissue Lower Limb pain
  • Hip pain

You can self-refer to the app by clicking on this link

Please use an email address that is unique to you and select the condition you need help to manage. We will then send you an email with all the information you need to get started.

You can download the getUBetter MSK app to your Smartphone for easiest access, or you can use the Webapp.

If you develop another condition, select your new condition from within the app and it will be added to your account.

The getUBetter MSK app is provided free of charge by Frimley Health & Care ICS for registered patients at GP Practices. It can be accessed on a Smartphone or on the Web, and guides you day-by-day through a sequence of exercises, tips, and support to help you recover from a range of new, recurrent or long term conditions:

  • Lower back pain
  • Back and leg pain
  • Neck pain
  • Shoulder pain
  • Ankle pain
  • Knee pain
  • Soft Tissue Lower Limb pain
  • Hip pain

You can self-refer to the app by clicking on this link

Please use an email address that is unique to you and select the condition you need help to manage. We will then send you an email with all the information you need to get started.

You can download the getUBetter MSK app to your Smartphone for easiest access, or you can use the Webapp.

If you develop another condition, select your new condition from within the app and it will be added to your account.

Make a Change Programme

The first night of our new 8 week course helping patients from Cedars Surgery in Maidenhead make a change, as they begin their journey to better health.

A real food lower carb approach, to help patients lose weight, reverse chronic disease, feel more energised and generally live their best life!

We will focus on so much more than food over the next 8 weeks… sleep, social interaction, movement, mental wellbeing, and avoidance of unhealthy habits.

Thank you to Public Health Collaboration, The Prince Philip Trust Fund and my partner in crime, Helen Ritchie, for support and collaboration in changing lives.

(4) Facebook

The first night of our new 8 week course helping patients from Cedars Surgery in Maidenhead make a change, as they begin their journey to better health.

A real food lower carb approach, to help patients lose weight, reverse chronic disease, feel more energised and generally live their best life!

We will focus on so much more than food over the next 8 weeks… sleep, social interaction, movement, mental wellbeing, and avoidance of unhealthy habits.

Thank you to Public Health Collaboration, The Prince Philip Trust Fund and my partner in crime, Helen Ritchie, for support and collaboration in changing lives.

(4) Facebook

1 Feb, 2023
22 Dec, 2022
Parking

Dear patients, there has been some incorrect reporting recently in local newspapers about parking at The Cedars Surgery.  Now that the demolition of the Magnet Leisure Centre has started, staff parking has been re-located to the old Tenpin area and is accessible via Kennet Road.  All parking immediately in front of both surgery's is now dedicated for patient use to ensure access without the need to walk across a busy construction site.  A total of 37 parking spaces is available to patients, including the original disabled parking bays directly in front of the pharmacy.

Dear patients, there has been some incorrect reporting recently in local newspapers about parking at The Cedars Surgery.  Now that the demolition of the Magnet Leisure Centre has started, staff parking has been re-located to the old Tenpin area and is accessible via Kennet Road.  All parking immediately in front of both surgery's is now dedicated for patient use to ensure access without the need to walk across a busy construction site.  A total of 37 parking spaces is available to patients, including the original disabled parking bays directly in front of the pharmacy.

Additional GP to support winter pressures

Today we welcome back Dr Adeel Shaffiq who was a trainee with use back in 2021.  Dr Shaffiq will be working Fridays to support winter pressure demand for the next 3 months.

Today we welcome back Dr Adeel Shaffiq who was a trainee with use back in 2021.  Dr Shaffiq will be working Fridays to support winter pressure demand for the next 3 months.

6 Jan, 2023
Welcome to the New Website

Welcome to The Cedar Surgery's new WEBSITE, we hope you will find it informative, useful and we welcome your feedback about it. We will try to keep it up to date as possible with surgery changes such as new patient services available to you, Covid changes and vaccine news and latest news. We will try to keep it up to date as possible with surgery changes such as new patient services available to you, Covid changes and vaccine news and latest news.

Welcome to The Cedar Surgery's new WEBSITE, we hope you will find it informative, useful and we welcome your feedback about it. We will try to keep it up to date as possible with surgery changes such as new patient services available to you, Covid changes and vaccine news and latest news. We will try to keep it up to date as possible with surgery changes such as new patient services available to you, Covid changes and vaccine news and latest news.